Smart Parking

When imagination and engineering come together

Posted on January 28, 2014 by When imagination and engineering come together
If you’re ever persuaded by family or friends to visit one of Disney’s theme parks, you can’t help but be struck by the mind-boggling amount of detail that they have gone into to make your visit just about as perfect as it can be.

The differentiation game

Posted on January 07, 2014 by The differentiation game
Almost every market that you can think of has its heroes. They’re the people that lead by example; the professionals that their peers and even their competitors look up to. They might have created or led their business onwards and upwards to greatness. Or, they could be the latest to head up an organisation that, from generation to generation, performs in an exceptional way.

In pictures and in words

Posted on November 18, 2013 by In pictures and in words
While other presentation software solutions are available, Microsoft’s PowerPoint has been the medium of choice for executives across the last twenty-ish years. It’s not surprising, then, that the merits and drawbacks of using computer-generated “slides” (to use the old-school term) as a way of communicating information are pinned on PowerPoint’s back.

Lots and lots of parking spaces

Posted on October 26, 2013 by Lots and lots of parking spaces
I’ve never been to Puerto Rico, but, seeing as it’s just east of the British Virgin Islands in the Caribbean, I should imagine it’s a very nice place indeed. With a population in excess of 3.5 million, an overall size of around 9,000 square kilometres, and a semi-detached relationship as a territory-but-not-a-state of the USA, it’s by no means a small place either.

Location, location, location

Posted on October 15, 2013 by Location, location, location
While American, Australian and New Zealander realtors often include the most gushing phrases in their house specifications – “check out this delight”… “in the dress circle…” “you’ll love to call this place home” – and so on – their British counterparts are usually far more reserved.